Meredith E. Newman

 Professor of Chemistry

Box 6679

238 Ferguson Science Center
Mars Hill University
Mars Hill, NC 38754
phone:  (828) 689-1401
FAX:  (828) 689-1596
email: mnewman@mhu.edu

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Curriculum Vitae

Courses Taught 
This Semester

Courses Taught 
at Mars Hill

Current Research

CHM 113

Past Research

CHM 227

CHM 114

Professional Experience


CHM 215

Education, Memberships

 

Courses Taught

CHM 235

Funded Research

BIO/CHM 450

Publication and Presentations

NS 113

 

 


Current Research

The Soil and Water Conservation Department of Madison County North Carolina began monitoring stream water quality in 1992 as part of The Volunteer Water Information Network (VWIN).  VWIN is a partnership of groups and individuals dedicated to preserving water quality in western North Carolina. Stream water sampling sites were selected to represent all areas of the county, to identify high quality waters as well as waters that may be degraded, and to provide baseline data to assess the impact of various land use activities.  An accurate and on-going water quality database, as provided by VWIN, is essential for good environmental planning.  The data gathered provides an increasingly accurate picture of water quality conditions and changes in these conditions over time.  Communities can use this data to identify streams of high water quality that need to be preserved, as well as streams that cannot support further development without significant water quality degradation.  Mars Hill University began water quality analyses for the VWIN program in Madison County in the fall of 2009.  Water quality in nine Madison County streams is currently being monitored.


Past Research

A data base supporting the hypothesis that plant nutrients, specifically nitrates and phosphates, present in acid deposition enhance eutrophication in well-buffered lakes in which the pH does not decrease significantly was developed for the Pine Lake watershed near Oneonta, NY.  Eutrophication is caused by excessive plant nutrient concentrations, primarily nitrates and phosphates, and consequently excessive plant growth. Although phosphates do not contribute to acid rain they may be associated with particulate matter from similar pollution sources. pH and a low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), also called alkalinity, are the primary indicators of acid deposition impact on surface water bodies.  However, many buffered lakes may be affected by acid deposition through eutrophication, without a significant decrease in pH. The Majority of Pine Lake’s watershed has been owned by Hartwick College since the late 1960s and, subsequently, there were few anthropogenic sources of nitrates and phosphates to Pine Lake. Nutrient concentrations in Pine Lake water as well as in wet and dry deposition to the Pine Lake watershed were monitored from 1997 through 2002.

Complex biological, geochemical, hydrological, and chemical processes control subsurface contaminant transport.  Many aspects of these processes have been, and are currently being, studied mechanistically at the laboratory scale.  In order to describe the interrelationships between these different processes under more realistic field scale heterogeneities, field scale tests are required.  I was part of a multi-disciplinary team of scientists who designed and implemented integrated laboratory and field scale adsorption, aquifer pumping, and infiltration tests.  These tests helped quantitate the significance of preferential flow under both saturated and unsaturated conditions, quantitate the extent of adsorption equilibrium under field conditions, and evaluate the applicability of laboratory measured parameter values in describing contaminant transport in the field.

Colloids may sorb significant quantities of pollutants due to their large surface areas relative to their mass.  The fate of colloids, and pollutants sorbed to colloids, is a function of their size distribution, morphology, and composition, as well as the chemistry and flow patterns of the water body.  A series of fractionation steps and analytical procedures were developed to non-destructively characterize colloids in the Rhine River.  This data was used with current coagulation-sedimentation models to evaluate the processes controlling the colloidal concentration and size distribution and to predict the fate of colloids and colloid-associated pollutants in the Rhine River.

Association of groundwater contaminants with mobile colloids may result in more rapid contaminant transport than predicted by current models.  In order to more accurately estimate the risk to human health resulting from groundwater contamination, colloid-associated contaminant transport was considered.  Laboratory column studies demonstrated that alterations in groundwater chemistry could result in the mobilization and subsequent transport of colloids.  This work demonstrated that the effects of solution chemistry on colloid mobilization and transport must be considered in designing waste disposal and treatment processes because most contaminant inputs to groundwater can alter the solution chemistry.

Mercury concentrations in soil/sediment, water, and fish tissue were determined before, during, and after the construction of Richard B. Russell Reservoir, a lake on the Savannah River, in order to test the hypothesis that natural background levels of mercury in soil can be mobilized through microbial methylation into the waters of newly impounded reservoirs leading to elevated mercury concentrations in edible fish.  Measured increases in the mercury concentration of fish tissue and changes in mercury speciation from primarily inorganic to primarily organic forms supported this hypothesis.

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Professional Experience

Mars Hill College, 2008 - present, Professor of Chemistry, and Coordinator of the Chemistry Program. The responsibilities of this position include (1) teaching courses such as general, analytical, inorganic and environmental chemistry, (2) guiding undergraduate student research, (3) encouraging students to enter the field of chemistry and providing them guidance concerning career options, preparation and pursuit, and (4) administrative duties such as completing annual reports and shepherding curriculum development and assessment.

 

Thomas Jefferson Classical Academy, 2007 - 2008, Instructor. The responsibilities of this position included (1) teaching chemistry and biology courses and (2) organizing and setting up a teaching laboratory.

Hartwick College, 2004 - 2007, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geology, and Chair of the Chemistry Department. The responsibilities of this position included (1) teaching courses such as environmental chemistry, chemistry for non science majors, general chemistry, environmental geology, geochemistry, and geohydrology in both the chemistry and geology departments, (2) guiding undergraduate student research in both chemistry and geology, (3) administrative duties such as reviewing annual faculty evaluations, submitting and administering the departmental budget, and shepherding the development and implementation of a departmental assessment plan.

Hartwick College, 2001 - 2003, 
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geology, and Coordinator of the Environmental Science and Policy Program. The responsibilities of this position included (1) teaching courses such as environmental chemistry, chemistry for non science majors, general chemistry, environmental geology, geochemistry, and geohydrology in both the chemistry and geology departments, (2) guiding undergraduate student research in both chemistry and geology, (3) encouraging students to enter the environmental field, providing them guidance in career options, organizing and promoting student participation in extracurricular environmental activities, and general administrative duties in organizing the environmental science and policy program.

Hartwick College, 1996 - 2001, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Geology, and Coordinator of the Environmental Science and Policy Program.

Clemson University, 1997 - 1999, Affiliate Faculty, Environmental Engineering and Science. This position primarily entailed supervising graduate research and serving on graduate student committees.

Clemson University, 1995-1996, Assistant Professor/Research Associate, Environmental Systems Engineering. This position entailed teaching a course in groundwater hydrology which covered such topics as saturated groundwater flow, natural groundwater chemistry, types and sources of contaminants, factors effecting contaminant transport, incorporation of contaminant transport in groundwater flow models, groundwater sampling, and groundwater contaminant remediation. This position also entailed actively pursuing research funding and supervision of graduate students.

The University of Idaho, Idaho Falls Campus, 1995, Affiliate Faculty, Environmental Sciences. This position involved teaching a graduate course in subsurface contaminant fate and transport which covered such topics as weathering reactions, natural groundwater chemistry, sources and types of contaminants, unsaturated and saturated fluid transport, factors affecting contaminant transport, and incorporation of contaminant transport in groundwater flow models. This position also entailed serving on graduate student committees.

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1992-1996, Senior Scientist, Integrated Earth Sciences. This position entailed actively pursuing external funding. I was the principal investigator for two projects funded by DOE. I was responsible for setup and operation of a research laboratory at the INEL including purchasing equipment, and hiring, training, and oversight of laboratory personnel, as well as oversight of graduate students working under a subcontract with Clemson University.

The University of Geneva, 1990-1992, Post-doctoral Researcher, Dept. of Analytical Chemistry. This position entailed working within an interactive group of four scientists. Responsibilities included experiment design and execution, organization of sampling expeditions, use of numerous analytical techniques and instruments, data organization and interpretation, presentation of results at conferences, and writing publications and reports to funding agencies.

Clemson University, 1987-1988, Instructor, Environmental Systems Engineering. Duties included full teaching responsibility for a senior level undergraduate course designed to introduce civil engineering students to the varied topics covered in environmental engineering, including environmental chemistry, water and wastewater treatment, hazardous waste handling and disposal, surface and groundwater contaminant transport, and risk assessment.

Clemson University, 1983-1989, Teaching Assistant, Environmental Systems Engineering. Duties included preparation and demonstrations for laboratories, assigning and grading homework, and helping students to grasp the concepts presented in graduate level environmental chemistry and engineering courses.

Medical College of Georgia, 1981-1983, Laboratory Chemist, Department of Reproductive Endocrinology. Responsibilities included use of numerous analytical techniques and instruments, as well as data organization, interpretation, and presentation.

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Education

 

Honors and Awards

 

Memberships

 

Symposia and Workshops Organized

 

 

Professional Journals and Funding Agencies for Which I Have Reviewed

 

 

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Courses Taught

Chemistry

 Environmental Science and Engineering

Geology

General Education

·         Introduction to Physical Science (Mars Hill College)

 

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Funded Research

    Curriculum.

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Publications and Presentations

Bhalla, V.K., V.P. Rajan, and M.E. Newman. 1983. Alcohol Induced Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Deficiency at the Testicular Level. Alc. Clin. Ex. 7(2): 153-162.

Looney, B.B., M.E. Newman, and A.W. Elzerman. 1990. Colloid Facilitated Transport in Groundwater: Laboratory and Field Studies. Hazardous Materials Control 3(4): 47-49.

Newman, M.E., A.W. Elzerman, and B.B. Looney. 1993. Facilitated Transport of Selected Metals in Laboratory Soil Columns. J. Contam. Hydrol. 14(3): 233-246.

Perret, D., M.E. Newman, J.C. Negre, Y. Chen, and J. Buffle. 1993. Submicron Particles in the Rhine River -- I. Physico-Chemical Characterization. Water Res 28(1): 91-106.

Newman, M.E., M. Filella, D. Perret, J.C. Negre, Y. Chen, and J. Buffle. 1993. Submicron Particles in the Rhine River -- II. Comparison of Field Observations and Model Predictions. Water Res 28(1): 107-118.

Dunnivant, F.M.,  M.E. Newman, I. Porro, C. Bishop, J. Hubbell, J.R. Giles. 1997. Verifying the Integrity of Annular and Back-Filling Seals for Monitoring Wells. Groundwater 35(1): 140-148.

Filella, M., J. Zhang, M.E. Newman, and J. Buffle. 1997. Analytical Applications of Photon Correlation Spectroscopy for Size Distribution Measurements of Natural Submicron Colloidal Suspensions: Capabilities and Limitations . Colloids and Surfaces, A: Physiochemical and Engineering Aspects. 120: 27-46.

Dunnivant, F.M., C.W. Bishop, J.D. Burgess, J.R. Giles, B.D. Higgs, J.M. Hubbell, E. Neher, M.E. Newman, G.T. Norrell, M.C. Pfiefer, I. Porro, J.B. Sisson, R.C. Starr, and A.H. Wylie. 1998. Water and Radioactive Tracer Flow in a Heterogeneous Field-scale  System. Groundwater 36(6):   949-958.

Dunnivant, F.M., M.J. Alfano, R. Brzenk, A. Moore, and M.E. Newman. 1999. A Comprehensive  Stream Study Designed for an Undergraduate Non-majors Course in Earth Systems Science . J. of Geologic Education. 47:  158-164.

Dunnivant, F.M., A. Moore, M.J Alfano, R. Brzenk, P.T. Buckley, and M.E. Newman. 2000. Understanding the Greenhouse Effect: I s Global Warming Real? An Integrated Lab-Lecture Exercise for Non-Science Majors.  J. of Chemical Education. 77(12):  1602-1603.

Porro, I., M.E. Newman, and F.M. Dunnivant. 2000. Strontium Distribution Coefficients Determined Under Various Saturation Levels in Basalt. Envrion. Sci. & Tech. 34(9):  1679-1686.

R.A. Fjeld, DeVol, T.A., R.W. Goff, M.D Blevins, S.M Ince, A.W Elzerman, and M.E. Newman. 2001. Column Test Analysis of Selected Actinides and Fission/ Activation Product Transport through Subsurface Basalt and Sedimentary Interbed Materials from the Snake River Plain . Nucl. Tech. 35: 92-108

Dunnivant F.M., D. Danowski, A. Timmons-Haroldson, M.E. Newman . 2002. Enviroland:  A simple Computer Program for Quantitative Stream Assessment.  The American Biology Teacher . 64(8): 589-595.
Dunnivant, F.M., D. Danowski, M.E. Newman, T. Spano, and F. Frye. 2002. Teaching Chemical Speciation to Environmental Chemists and Geochemists using

Enviroland.  J. of Geoscicence Education . 50(5).
Dunnivant, F.M., D. Danowski, and M.E. Newman. 2002. Teaching Pollutant Fate and Transport Concepts to Undergraduate Non-Science Majors, Environmental

 Scientists, and Hydrologists using Enviroland.  J. of Geoscicence Education 50(5).
J.S. Powers, Kalicin, M., and M.E. Newman. 2004.  Tree species do not influence local soil chemistry in a species-rich Costa Rica rain forest.  J. of Tropical Ecology.

20:587-590.

Buffle, J., D. Perret, M.E. Newman . 1992. The Use of Filtration and Ultrafiltration for Size Fractionation of Aquatic Particles, Colloids and Macromolecules, in Characterization of Environmental Particles . J. Buffle and H.P. van Leeuwen, Eds., Lewis Publishers Inc., Chelsea, MI.

Schurtenberger, P., M.E. Newman. 1993. Characterization of Biological and Environmental Particles Using Static and Dynamic Light Scattering, in Characterization of Environmental Particles: II . J. Buffle and H.P. van Leeuwen, Eds., Lewis Publishers Inc., Chelsea, MI. 

M.E. Newman. 2005. The Chemistry of the Environment, in Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity, 6th Ed., J.C. Kotz and P.M. Treichel, Jr., Eds., Thompson Learning

Inc., USA.

 

Abernathy, A.R., M.E. Newman , and W.D. Nicholas. 1985. Mercury Mobilization from Soil and Its Uptake by Fish Resulting from the Filling of Richard B. Russell Reservoir . Completion Report to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Environmental Lab., Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS.

Abernathy, A.R., M.E. Newman, and W.D. Nicholas. 1985. Mercury Mobilization and Biomagnification Resulting from the Filling of a Piedmont Reservoir. Completion Report to Water Resources Research Institute, Clemson University, Clemson, SC. G-932-07.

Buffle, J., Y. Chen, J.C. Negre, M.E. Newman, and D. Perret. 1992. Characterization of Colloidal Particles in the Rhine River and Their Role in the Elimination of Micropollutants. Completion Report to Sandoz Funds for the Rhine River, Sandoz Technology Ltd., Basle, Switzerland.

Newman, M.E. 1994. Integrated Large-Scale Aquifer Pumping and Infiltration Tests - Water Sampling and Analysis Test Plan . Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, EGG-ER-11367.

Newman, M.E., F.M. Dunnivant. 1995. Results from the Large-Scale Aquifer Pumping and Infiltration Test: Transport of Tracers Through Fractured Media. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID. INEL-95/146, ER-WAG7-77.

Newman, M.E., I. Porro, R. Scott, F.M. Dunnivant, R.W. Goff, M.D. Blevins, S. M. Ince, J.D. Leyba, T.A. DeVol, A.W. Elzerman, R.A. Fjeld. 1995. Evaluation of the Mobility of Am, Cs, Co, Pu, Sr, and U through INEL Basalt and Interbed Materials: Summary Report of the INEL/Clemson University Laboratory Studies. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Idaho Falls, ID, INEL-95/282, ER-WAG7-82.

Dunnivant, F.M., and M.E. Newman. 1995. Preliminary Modeling of Breakthrough Curves from the Large-Scale Aquifer Pumping and Infiltration Test. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, INEL-95/288, ER-WAG7-84. 

Lacy, C., L. Malloy, S. Carbone, M.E. Newman, M. Allen. 2004. Women & Science Roundtable – Gotsch Symposium on Women and Work. Phoebe:  Gender & Cultural Critiques. 16(2):  49-60.

 

Newman, M.E., and A.R. Abernathy. Mercury Accumulation by Fish in Richard B. Russell Reservoir . South Carolina Academy of Sciences 59th Annual Meeting, Clemson University, April, 1986.

Newman, M.E., A.R. Abernathy, and A.W. Elzerman. Mercury Mobilization Resulting from the Filling of Richard B. Russell Reservoir . Division of Environmental Chemistry, American Chemical Society, Anaheim, CA, Sept., 1986.

Newman, M.E., and A.W. Elzerman. Enhanced Mobility of Waste Derived Metals in Column Studies of Groundwater Transport . Division of Environmental Chemistry, American Chemical Society, New Orleans, LA, Sept., 1987.

Newman, M.E., A.W. Elzerman, and B.B. Looney. Facilitated Transport of Selected Metals in Laboratory Soil Columns . Division of Environmental Chemistry, American Chemical Society, Miami, FL, Sept., 1989.

Newman, M.E., and A.W. Elzerman. Facilitated Transport of Selected Metals in Soil Packed Laboratory Columns . 2nd Soil Residue Analysis Workshop. International Association of Environmental Analytical Chemistry. Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland, March, 1991.

Newman, M.E., F.M. Dunnivant, and J.B. Sisson. Transport of Radionuclides through Fractured Media during the Large-Scale Aquifer Pumping and Infiltration Test . Poster, American Geophysical Union, Baltimore, MD, May, 1995.

Moore, A. Brzenk, R., Buckley, P., Hamilton, D. Nagel, W., Newman, M.E., and Young, S., Improving Science Literacy in General Education:  An Interdisciplinary Course Sequence In Earth Systems Science, Second International Conference on Geoscience Education, Hilo, Hawaii, July 28-August 1, 1997.

Newman, M.E., Growing Pains:  Observations on Starting a New Environmental Chemistry Program at Undergraduate Institutions, 221st American Chemical Society National Meeting, San Diego, CA, April 2001.

Newman, M.E., Relationships between Suspended Solids, Total Solids, Conductivity, Turbidity, Ionic Strength, and Activity Illustrated in a Laboratory Exercise, 221st American Chemical Society National Meeting, San Diego, CA, April 2001.

Newman, M.E., Teaching Environmental Science Outdoors, 75th New York State Geological Association Annual Meeting, Oneonta, NY, October 2003.

 

R.M. El-Farhan, A.W. Elzerman, and M.E. Newman . Contaminant Plume Modification Effects on Heavy Metal Sorption and Release from SRS Soil, Emerging Technologies in Hazardous Waste Management VIII, The Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society, Birmingham, AL, Sept., 1996.

M.H. Kalicin, and M.E. Newman. The Significance of Atmospheric Inputs to the Nutrient Load and Budget of Pine Lake , Poster, American Geophysical Union, Boston, MA, May, 1998.

M.J. Alfano, R. Brzenk, P. Buckley, F. Dunnivant, D. Hamilton, A. Moore, M.E. Newman, and S. Young, An Integrated, Interdisciplinary Course Sequence in Earth Systems Science , American Geophysical Union, Boston, MA, May 1998.

F. Frye, F. Dunnivant, and M.E. Newman, Effects of EDTA on Copper Transport in a Ground Water System, The NY Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Skidmore College, April 26, 1998.

M.H. Kalicin, and M.E. Newman, The Effect of Tree Species on Soil Chemistry and Nutrients in a Tropical Wet-Forest in Costa Rica, Poster, 217th American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, California, March 21-25, 1999.

M.H. Kalicin, and M.E. Newman, The Significance of Atmospheric Inputs to the Nutrient Load and Budget of Pine Lake , Poster, Northeast Regional Meeting (NERM) of the American Chemical Society, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY, June 22-25, 1999.

D.A. Danowski, D.M. Dunnivant, and M.E. Newman, An Interactive Computer Tool for Teaching Hydrology, Geological Society of America, Denver, CO, October, 1999.

T.A. Spano and M.E. Newman, Nutrient Budget for a Well-Buffered Lake in Upstate New York, 219th American Chemical Society National Meeting, Poster, San Francisco, CA, March 26-30, 2000.

O.V. Barker and M.E. Newman, Selective Extraction of Metals from Contaminated Soils Using Organic Complexants, 219th American Chemical Society National Meeting, San Francisco, CA, March 26-30, 2000.

N.A. Steele and M.E. Newman, The Effects of Acid Rain on a Well Buffered Lake, Council on Undergraduate Research, Posters on the Hill, Washington D.C., March 2001.

 

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